NCRM Videos


NCRM videos

This page lists the NCRM and Methods@Manchester video podcasts. These include methodological seminars, presentations, online tutorials and short clips on new and established research methods.

You can also find NCRM and Methods@Manchester videos on the NCRMUK YouTube and Methods@Manchester YouTube channels.

Use the typology search to search our videos using terms from the NCRM research methods typology.


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In Conversation with L. Hannan and N. Lackovic_Material methods 3: history and other disciplines

Natasa Lackovic, Hannan Leonie

11-01-2021

This is the third episode of an NCRM “in conversation” series that focuses upon the emerging field of material methods. Natasa Lackovic is in conversation with Leonie Hannan who talks about her work using material methods from her perspective as an historian and interdisciplinary researcher. Leonie provides insights on material culture, object-based learning in collaboration with an interdisciplinary team of scholars and students, and a “return and repetition” method, reflecting on the history and futures of material methods.



In Conversation with Stitching Together and Sophie Woodward; Material methods 2

Sophie Woodward, Amy Twigger Holroyd, Emma Shercliff

19-11-2020

This is the second episode of an NCRM “In Conversation” series that focuses upon the emerging field of material methods where Sophie Woodward talks to Amy Twigger Holroyd and Emma Shercliff about the Stitching Together network. Stitching Together is a network of academics and practitioners that develop and use a variety of participatory textile making methods to address wide ranging issues. Amy and Emma introduce some of these projects as well as outline the potentials for cross-disciplinary developments of these practice-based material methods.



Material methods: creative methods. In conversation between Sophie Woodward and Natasa Lackovic

Sophie Woodward, Natasa Lackovic

12-10-2020

This is the first episode of an NCRM “in conversation” series that focuses upon the emerging field of material methods. Sophie Woodward introduces what material methods are, and discusses them as ways to understand materiality and materials as well as part of the broader remit of creative methods. Through conversation, Natasa Lackovic introduces Inquiry Graphics methods as an example of material methods. This is the first in a series of conversations that will explore different material methods, through a range of different disciplines, showcasing different academics and methods.



Count data - a tale of Poisson and predicting football results

Vernon Gayle

16-09-2020

Professor Vernon Gayle (University of Edinburgh) introduces the Poisson distribution. A sporting example is used to exemplify the concept of expected outcomes. Some social science examples are provided and some alternative models for count data are introduced. For more resources related to this video visit https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/



The Data Analysis Workflow

Vernon Gayle

03-09-2020

This 28-minute video introduces the concept of the data analysis workflow. The focus of this video is social science research that employs statistical techniques to analyse data. Many of the issues associated with the statistical data analysis workflow also pervade other forms of social science research (e.g. qualitative data analysis), despite the different nature of the data and the analytical techniques that are used. To find supporting materials please visit https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/data_analysis_workflow/



Reproducible Social Research

Vernon Gayle

03-09-2020

The focus of this video is social science research that employs statistical techniques to analyse observational data (e.g. social surveys). Many of the issues associated with undertaking transparent and reproducible data analysis pervade other forms of social science research (e.g. qualitative data analysis), despite the different nature of the data and the analytical techniques that are used. List of related literature and the ppt slides from this presentation are available on the NCRM Online Resources website https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/



Walking methods in practice - two international case studies (video 2 of 3)

Michael Duignan

02-09-2020

Dr. Michael B. Duignan (University of Surrey) details how theory and examples in Video 1 apply to Olympic cities as one example of an extreme environment. Specifically how Olympic cities become temporarily spatially reconfigured and how this temporarily (though sometimes permanently) changes the way visitors, residents flow and businesses operate across the city. These changes include roads, parks, beaches, whole town centres et cetera, and represent just a few of the complex ways a city is transformed as a result of hosting the Olympics. This video is part of Online Resource produced by NCRM. This is video 2 of 3. To view to full resource visit https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/



Limitations of walking methods and integrating digital methods for disseminating results (3 of 3)

Michael Duignan

02-09-2020

Dr Michael B. Duignan (University of Surrey), details the limitations of walking methods, particularly mini-ethnographies that are of a limited length in time and how these can be partially overcome by extending analysis or by triangulating with other methods and data sets. The video closes by discussing digital participatory techniques (e.g. vlogging and micrologging) to help disseminate findings and stimulate dialogue with potential stakeholders who may be interested or may impact your work. This video is a part of Online Learning Resource developed by NCRM. This is video 3 of 3. To see the full resource visit https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/



The body as research instrument in your research cycle (video 3 of 3)

Kief Eline

02-09-2020

This video further adapts this concept of the body as instrument to the academic research cycle, including practical suggestions of how you can include bodily awareness and a movement approach in your own research. This video is part of Online Resource produced by NCRM. This is video 1 of 3. The series is called Embodied Methodologies: The Body as Research Instrument. Find out more here https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/ Dr Eline Kief is a research fellow at the Centre for Dance Research, Coventry University Acknowledgements: NCRM grant to develop the Somatics Toolkit for Ethnographers Further Resources: www.somaticstoolkit.coventry.ac.uk



Movement exploration of lines, angles and circles (video 2 of 3)

Eline Kieft

02-09-2020

This video provides a practice opportunity for you to try out moving with lines and angles versus circles and spirals, and serves as an example to derive insights through movement. This video is part of Online Resource produced by NCRM. This is video 2 of 3. The series is called Embodied Methodologies: The Body as Research Instrument. Find out more here https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/ Dr Eline Kief is a research fellow at the Centre for Dance Research, Coventry University Acknowledgements: NCRM grant to develop the Somatics Toolkit for Ethnographers Further Resources: www.somaticstoolkit.coventry.ac.uk



Somatic introduction and knowing with the body (video 1 of 3)

Eline Kieft

02-09-2020

This video briefly introduces the discipline of somatic practices, leading up to a wider view on knowledge and perception than one only based in cognition. Instead, the entire body can be considered as a way to get to know things. This video is part of Online Resource produced by NCRM. This is video 1 of 3. The series is called Embodied Methodologies: The Body as Research Instrument. Find out more here https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/ Dr Eline Kief is a research fellow at the Centre for Dance Research, Coventry University Acknowledgements: NCRM grant to develop the Somatics Toolkit for Ethnographers Further Resources: www.somaticstoolkit.coventry.ac.uk



Theory of walking methods (video 1 of 3)

Michael Duignan

02-09-2020

Dr. Michael B. Duignan (University of Surrey) details what walking methods are, how they have evolved, why they are useful. Specifically, how they have become popularised across a variety of disciplines + fields, including anthropology, human geography, sociology, + tourism. Particularly useful for accessing entangled relationships that exist between humans, non-humans, natural and social environments. And, how complex environments can be rich in data and accessed by walking and associated activities like riding bikes, back of taxi or other modes of public / private transport. This video is part of online learning resource created by NCRM. This is video 1 of 3. To see the whole resouce visit https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/



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