Measuring energy poverty and its effect on people's health and wellbeing outcomes - Online

Date:

24/04/2023 - 25/04/2023

Organised by:

NCRM, University of Southampton

Presenter:

Dr Apostolos Davillas and Dr Andrew Burlinson

Level:

Intermediate (some prior knowledge)

Contact:

Jacqui Thorp
Training and Capacity Building Coordinator, National Centre for Research Methods, University of Southampton
Email: jmh6@soton.ac.uk

video conference logo

Venue: Online

Description:

Britain’s energy regulator Ofgem has significantly increased its cap on energy prices twice in 2022 with further rises predicted for 2023. This is in response to the skyrocketing price of gas, aggravated by demand picking up as countries relaxed lockdown measures, low-wind speeds, and bottlenecks in supply chains. Over the same period, a recent ONS survey found that of the adults who reported a rise in the cost of living, 79% reported energy bills among the relevant causes.

This two-day online course aims to postgraduate researchers and analysts interested in quantitative analysis of energy poverty and its effect on people’s wellbeing. This consists of lectures and practical sessions on measurement of energy poverty and on (causal) analysis on its effect of people’s health and wellbeing outcomes.

The measurement of fuel poverty can be explored from two key perspectives. The objective approach relies primarily on household income and expenditure on energy bills to measure the prevalence of fuel poverty. In contrast, the subjective (sometimes referred to the ‘consensual’) approach uses households stated ability to afford energy at a reasonable price as well as characteristics of the home (e.g., damp). We will explore the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches. In addition, we will explore key associations between fuel poverty and outcomes that affect the health, wellbeing and wealth of individuals.

The course covers:

  • The set of different measures to define energy poverty;
  • (Causal) analytical methods to explore the association of energy poverty with health and wellbeing outcomes;
  • Empirical evidence on the association between various definitions of energy poverty and wellbeing outcomes;
  • Practical example and real word evidence using Stata. 

By the end of the course participants will:

  • be able to understand the different definitions of energy poverty;
  • be aware of the set of analytical methods to be used in the analysis of the association between energy poverty and wellbeing outcomes;
  • implement analysis using Stata on the measurement of energy poverty based on its various definitions;
  • implement (causal) econometric analysis to explore the association between energy poverty and a set of wellbeing outcomes.

This course is suitable for postgraduate researchers and analysts interested in energy poverty research including (but not limited to): Academics, Government Researchers, Third sector organisations and Consultancy analysts.

Programme

Day 1 – Fuel poverty measurement

8:00-10:00 – Introduction to energy poverty

10:00-10:15 (Virtual) coffee break (Q&A session)

10:15-11:45 – How to measure energy poverty (objective approach)

11:45-13:15 – How to measure energy poverty (subjective approach)

13:15-14:15 Lunch

14:15-15:15 Practical sessions using Stata and illustrative examples

Day 2  – The effects of fuel poverty

8:00-10:00 – The impact of fuel poverty on health and wellbeing

10:00-10:15 (Virtual) coffee break (Q&A session)

10:15-11:45 – Energy prices and food consumption patterns

11:45-13:15 – Fuel poverty and financial distress

13:15-14:15 Lunch

14:15-15:15 Practical sessions using Stata and illustrative examples

 

Cost:

The fee per teaching day is: • £30 per day for registered students • £60 per day for staff at academic institutions, Research Councils researchers, public sector staff, staff at registered charity organisations and recognised research institutions. • £100 per day for all other participants In the event of cancellation by the delegate a full refund of the course fee is available up to two weeks prior to the course. No refunds are available after this date. If it is no longer possible to run a course due to circumstances beyond its control, NCRM reserves the right to cancel the course at its sole discretion at any time prior to the event. In this event every effort will be made to reschedule the course. If this is not possible or the new date is inconvenient a full refund of the course fee will be given. NCRM shall not be liable for any costs, losses or expenses that may be incurred as a result of the cancellation of a course. The University of Southampton’s Online Store T&Cs also continue to apply.

Website and registration:

Region:

South East

Keywords:

Explanatory Research and Causal analysis, Survey and Questionnaire Design, Energy poverty, 'Eat or heat' dilemma, Deprivation, Economics of wellbeing, Survey measurement of health

Related publications and presentations:

Explanatory Research and Causal analysis
Survey and Questionnaire Design

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